“… Tosca responds, of course, with Vissi d’arte, a famous showstopper, but also a heartfelt testimonial threaded seamlessly into the drama as rendered in rich voice by the American soprano Melody Moore-Wagner.”

Montréal Gazette

“But it is Melody Moore-Wagner, at once sparkling and mischievous in her jealousy, sensitive and overwhelming in her tragedy, which captivates us from the beginning to the end. One feels she is at ease in this role that is so demanding, totally possessed by its tortured character who plunges into the drama out of love for her lover. Melody Moore-Wagner sings her role with great ease, she enjoys and takes possession of the stage.”

{Mais c’est surtout Melody Moore-Wagner, à la fois pétillante et espiègle dans sa jalousie, sensible et bouleversante dans sa tragédie, qui nous captive d’un bout à l’autre. On la sent à l’aise dans ce rôle pourtant si exigeant, totalement possédée par son personnage torturé qui plonge dans le drame par amour pour son amant. Melody Moore-Wagner chante avec une grande facilité sa partition, s’amuse et prend possession de la scène.}

Sors-tu.ca

“Moore delivers a brilliant: Vissi d’Arte that is very sensual, captivating and descriptive of the inner tumult that the Diva Floria has to face with the unwanted advances of Scarpia.”

Mountain Lake PBS

American soprano Melody Moore has appeared on many of the leading opera stages of the world, including as Mimi in La Bohème at the English National Opera, and as Regine St. Laurent in Rufus Wainwright’s Prima Donna at the New York City Opera.

One of the finest opera singers of her generation, Moore is probably best-known for her signature role, as Floria Tosca in Puccini’s masterpiece Tosca, a role she will reprise to open the 2017-2018 season of L’Opéra de Montréal.

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Soprano Melody Moore believes in female empowerment — perhaps that’s why she’s so drawn to the Lady Macbeths and Floria Toscas of the operatic stage. Luckily, these are the types of roles she’s been polishing since her earliest days as a budding singer, meticulously analyzing each and every leading lady throughout her development. But Moore is all grown up now, and on May 13 she once again steps into the title role of Puccini’s Tosca at LA Opera, under the baton of Maestro Grant Gershon.

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“As the ill-fated heroine, Melody Moore combined her splendid vocal and theatrical gifts to deeply moving effect. She had full control over her powerful soprano, projecting the high-lying part easily across Janáček’s most tempestuous orchestration and applying exquisite shading and shaping. Moore conveyed Katya’s fear of her locked-up emotions with tremulous beauty, turning her final scene into an ecstatic vision of release that kept a refreshing distance from clichés of operatic madness.”

Thomas May – The Seattle Times

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“Wagner fans will be more satisfied with good solos from Melody Moore’s Senta, with a clear tone and solid acting …”

American-Statesman Staff – Austin360

“Moore was the right combination of sweet and spicy to execute the role of the desperate Senta. Her conviction of love and admiration proclaimed through a ballad sung to her fellow seamstresses, was beautiful and lively executed. Moore’s love triangle introduced with a local man Erik (played by Clay Hilley) added another element of drama and surprising abuse. This plot line displayed the full circle love story of unrequited and missed love.”

Amy Bradley – Broadway World

“If another singer were to insert sobs into Richard Strauss’s “Befreit,” as Melody Moore did at her New York recital debut on May 25, it might well seem vulgar. The song’s text and melody alone offer so complete a portrayal of grieving devotion that no such extramusical gesture is necessary. But Moore had already proved herself to be a performer of such honesty that could you not only forgive her the effect, but understand its naked emotionality as a manifestation of her open, uninhibited stage persona. This was in fact as moving a “Befreit” as I’ve ever heard: sobs and all, Moore delivered its pathos exactly.

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