Following a spectacular run as Marta in Weinberg’s The Passenger with Houston Grand Opera, Melody Moore returned to the company to sing Dorabella in Mozart’s sparkling comedy Così fan tutte, to rave reviews:

“A cast of six strong singers carried the HGO performance of Mozart’s Così Fan Tutte . . . At the heart of this comedy are the two sisters and their tested, wavering fidelity, and the performances given by sopranos Rachel Willis-Sørensen (Fiordiligi) and Melody Moore (Dorabella) featured the remarkable pairing of gorgeous and beautifully matched voices and convincingly distinguished stage personae. Willis-Sørensen’s soprano excels . . . and the brighter richness of Moore’s singing was its ideal counterpoint. Their sound also complemented their characters . . . Moore, as the weaker mark, brilliantly mugged stalwart “me-too!” agreements with her sister, wild histrionics in her Act I “Smanie implacabili,” and agonized vacillations in response to the disguised Guglielmo’s overtures.”
Gregory Barnett – Opera News

“The Dorabella, soprano Melody Moore, displayed vocal security throughout the range of a role usually assayed by mezzo-sopranos . . . Moore’s spirited delivery of Dorabella’s two arias and her flirtatious acting suggest that, as she moves further into the weightier roles in Wagner, Verdi and Puccini, she should not leave Mozart behind.”
Operawarhorses.com

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Opera Warhorses | November 5, 2014

Wm: My custom is to ask each artist what their earliest memories of music were. What are yours?

MM: I was involved in church music and singing in front the congregation. I had no introduction to classical music until high school.

Wm: What was your introduction to classical music?

MM: My family moved from Memphis to Houston, where I auditioned for the Kingwood High School choir.

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“ … soprano Melody Moore sang with vibrancy and agitation as Freia . . .”
Steven Brown – Houston Chronicle

“As Freia, the goddess Wotan treats as expendable, Melody Moore ‘s lush soprano instrument pulls on our heartstrings and leaves us rooting for her to be saved from the clutches of Fasolt and Fafner.”
David Clarke – Broadway World

“Melody Moore is another fine singer at the beginning of a major career. She is excellent as Freia…”
Gregory Sullivan Isaacs – TheaterJones

James Gill Photography  Scott Piper and Melody MooreMadison Opera Demonstrates Exactly What Great Opera Is All About
Madison Magazine | By Greg Hettmansberger

If you’ve never been sure that you really ever understood what opera is all about, all you need to do is get to the Overture Center Sunday afternoon and watch Madison Opera present Puccini’s Tosca, and at the final curtain you’ll know exactly what all the shouting is about. Chances are pretty good you’ll even let loose with a “bravo” or two, because nearly everyone involved in this riveting production deserves one. In fact, the only problem in writing this review is the risk of omitting a contribution worth singling out. Let’s start with the easy stuff: the gorgeous sets and costumes come courtesy of Seattle Opera, which means that Madison has a company healthy enough to invest in that kind of rental, and enjoys a space like Overture Hall in which to employ them. The heart of the matter though, is singing; if you don’t have persuasive voices, the prettiest stage and the greatest orchestra are crippled. No worries: Melody Moore in the title role delivers on all the hype that resulted when she stepped in as Tosca on opening night (beginning with Act 2 no less!) at the San Francisco Opera almost exactly one year ago. That central act contains the diva’s “big hit,” “Vissi d’arte,” and Moore reaped as prolonged an ovation Friday night as I’ve heard at Madison Opera. But better still was her ability to deliver two kinds of chemistry: the jealously unstable but passionate love for Cavaradossi, and the flip side, a skin-crawling revulsion for Scarpia, as dark a villain as inhabits the operatic hall of shame.

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