“Moore and Tigges give the show a captivating, beating heart with a stunning performance of Act 2’s crucial love duet. Conductor Arthur Fagen gives forceful drama to the music’s juxtaposed moments of full, lush orchestration and dramatic quiet. Moore and Tigges bring to life a cosmic, legendary love, but also give the scene interesting touches of the recognizably human, as Senta takes the daring step of falling in love with a stranger and the isolated Dutchman exposes his vulnerability.”
myAJC

“Mellifluous-voiced American soprano Melody Moore portrays Senta, first appearing in Act II, whose obsession over the folk legend of the Flying Dutchman becomes truly compulsive when she and the Dutchman ultimately meet. ”

ArtsAtl

For the American soprano, the important thing is to always keep the character relevant and realistic. “I love our director because Jose Maria Condemi is a thinking director, he actually thinks how much time has passed between this event and that event and what would have happened in that time. Often you would see Tosca come up to Act three with her full regalia dress, a crown and some big cloak made of velvet.  And it’s not realistic because she just got off a safe passage to get out of the city and she’s been told at what time this fake execution is going to happen. So she would have had time to go and make herself a bit more discreet to be running to the streets and save Cavaradossi. You don’t do that in a full gown and a crown! You just don’t! Andrew is a real persons’ director. He wants the action to be realistic, so there is not a lot of parking and barking.” [Referring to the tendency of some singers and productions to stand up and sing without much acting].

Visit My Scena to read the rest of the article and listen to an excerpt from Vissi d’arte.

“… Tosca responds, of course, with Vissi d’arte, a famous showstopper, but also a heartfelt testimonial threaded seamlessly into the drama as rendered in rich voice by the American soprano Melody Moore-Wagner.”

Montréal Gazette

“But it is Melody Moore-Wagner, at once sparkling and mischievous in her jealousy, sensitive and overwhelming in her tragedy, which captivates us from the beginning to the end. One feels she is at ease in this role that is so demanding, totally possessed by its tortured character who plunges into the drama out of love for her lover. Melody Moore-Wagner sings her role with great ease, she enjoys and takes possession of the stage.”

{Mais c’est surtout Melody Moore-Wagner, à la fois pétillante et espiègle dans sa jalousie, sensible et bouleversante dans sa tragédie, qui nous captive d’un bout à l’autre. On la sent à l’aise dans ce rôle pourtant si exigeant, totalement possédée par son personnage torturé qui plonge dans le drame par amour pour son amant. Melody Moore-Wagner chante avec une grande facilité sa partition, s’amuse et prend possession de la scène.}

Sors-tu.ca

“Moore delivers a brilliant: Vissi d’Arte that is very sensual, captivating and descriptive of the inner tumult that the Diva Floria has to face with the unwanted advances of Scarpia.”

Mountain Lake PBS

American soprano Melody Moore has appeared on many of the leading opera stages of the world, including as Mimi in La Bohème at the English National Opera, and as Regine St. Laurent in Rufus Wainwright’s Prima Donna at the New York City Opera.

One of the finest opera singers of her generation, Moore is probably best-known for her signature role, as Floria Tosca in Puccini’s masterpiece Tosca, a role she will reprise to open the 2017-2018 season of L’Opéra de Montréal.

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Soprano Melody Moore believes in female empowerment — perhaps that’s why she’s so drawn to the Lady Macbeths and Floria Toscas of the operatic stage. Luckily, these are the types of roles she’s been polishing since her earliest days as a budding singer, meticulously analyzing each and every leading lady throughout her development. But Moore is all grown up now, and on May 13 she once again steps into the title role of Puccini’s Tosca at LA Opera, under the baton of Maestro Grant Gershon.

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“As the ill-fated heroine, Melody Moore combined her splendid vocal and theatrical gifts to deeply moving effect. She had full control over her powerful soprano, projecting the high-lying part easily across Janáček’s most tempestuous orchestration and applying exquisite shading and shaping. Moore conveyed Katya’s fear of her locked-up emotions with tremulous beauty, turning her final scene into an ecstatic vision of release that kept a refreshing distance from clichés of operatic madness.”

Thomas May – The Seattle Times

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